rsnapshot tips&tricks

July 19, 2009

rsnapshot is a great application for taking backups. It uses rsync and hard links, and makes backup management very easy. It comes with a nice perl script, rsnapreport, which reads the output of the rsync commands used by rsnapshot, and prints a useful report, with the stats of each rsync command.

For detailed info about rsnapshot, you can visit the website of the project.

A typical configuration would set up a cronjob, in which the output of the rsnapshot sync command(or rsnapshot daily, if the sync_first option is not enabled), is piped to rsnapreport, and the output of rsnapreport is piped to a CLI SMTP client, to send us a mail with the stats of the sync operation.(sendEmail is a very nice SMTP client ;) ).

However, if you’re taking backups from multiple machines, the sync operation can last longer than expected. So, if the datablock timeout in our SMTP server isn’t large enough, we will never get an email.

This is solved if we use a wrapper script for the rsnapshot sync operation. We use that script for the cronjob, and inside the script we have something like this:

#!/bin/sh
rsnapshot sync > /tmp/rsync_stats 2>&1
cat /tmp/rsync_stats | rsnapreport.pl | sendEmail -f backup@foo -t user@bar -u rsnapshot report
rm -f /tmp/rsync_stats

And problem solved! ;)

Linux uses a rather complicated(for me) driver model, which is built upon the kobject abstratction. There’s a lot of documentation about the linux driver model, and describing it in detail is out of the scope of this post(well, actually I can’t do it : P ).

In short:
kobjects are structs that hold some information(a name, a reference count, a parent pointer etc), and are usually embedded into other structs, typically structs for devices/device drivers(ie struct cdev, for a character device), creating a hieararchy which is ‘exported’ to userspace through the sysfs(mounted on /sys).
The question is how the code that works with kobjects can reference the struct that contains the kobject. The kernel provides a macro, (not surprisingly) called container_of, which does exactly that.
The definition of the macro can be found in include/linux/kernel.h:

/**
* container_of - cast a member of a structure out to the containing structure
* @ptr: the pointer to the member.
* @type: the type of the container struct this is embedded in.
* @member: the name of the member within the struct.
*
*/
#define container_of(ptr, type, member) ({ \
const typeof( ((type *)0)->member ) *__mptr = (ptr); \
(type *)( (char *)__mptr - offsetof(type,member) );})

In order to understand what this macro does, we have to be somewhat familiar with the C Preprocessor, and some non-standard GCC extensions:
1)A parenthesis followed by a brace. This is called by the GCC statement expression. It lets us use a compound statement as an expression. Here, we want to use the container_of macro as an expression, but we want to declare a local variable(__mptr) inside the macro, so we need a compound statement.
2)The typeof GCC extension that lets us refer to the type of an expression, and can be used to declare variables.

The previous two extensions let us write safe macros(ie side effects of the operands are calculated only once) that work for any type(some kind of polymorphism), and can be used as expressions.

This macro also uses the offsetof, which computes the byte offset of a field within a structure. Linux uses the compiler-provided offsetof, if the compiler provides one, else it defines the offsetof macro as

#define offsetof(TYPE, MEMBER) ((size_t) &((TYPE *)0)->MEMBER)

A few words about offsetof. offsetof is a valid ANSI C macro. Cfaq gives a possible implementation of offsetof(though non-portable) which is a bit different than the one that the kernel defines. I’m not sure about this, but as far as I can understand, the cfaq offsetof subtracts a NULL pointer from the ((type *)0)->member, to ensure that the offset is correct, even if the internal representation of the NULL pointers isn’t actually zero. I guess Linux has good reasons to assume that’s OK to ommit that subtraction.

And the last trick is the ((type *)0) cast. Actually, we pretend that there’s an instance of the struct at address 0. If we tried to reference it, we would be in big trouble, but that never happens. So we trick the compiler and we can legally get the type of the struct member, which is used to declare the __mptr as a pointer to that struct member. It’s also used by offsetof to get the byte offset of the mebmer within the struct(since it uses as a ‘base address’ for the struct the address 0).

Now we can understand(at least partially) what the macro does. It declares a pointer to the member of the struct that ptr points to, and assigns ptr to it. Now __mptr points to the same address as ptr. Then it gets the offset of that mebmer within the struct, and subtracts it from the actual address of the member of the struct ‘instance'(ie __mptr). The (char *)__mptr cast is necessary, so that ‘pointer arithmetic’ will work as intended, ie subtract from __mptr exactly the (size_t) bytes that offsetof ‘returns’.

At this point, I really can’t understand why we couldn’t use the ptr pointer directly. We could ommit the first line, and the macro could be

#define container_of(ptr, type, member) (type *)( (char *)(ptr) - offsetof(type,member) )

ptr is used only once — we don’t need to worry about side effects.
Maybe it’s just good coding practice.

EDIT: Apparently, the first line is there for ‘type checking’. It ensures that type has a member called member(howerver this is done by offsetof macro too, I think), and if ptr isn’t a pointer to the correct type(the type of the member), the compiler will print a warning, which can be useful for debuging.

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